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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Timber harvesting residue treatment: Part 1. Responses of conifer seedlings, soils and microclimate

Published source details

Zabowski D., Java B., Scherer G., Everett R. & Ottmar R. (2000) Timber harvesting residue treatment: Part 1. Responses of conifer seedlings, soils and microclimate. Forest Ecology and Management, 126, 25-34


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Manage woody debris before tree planting Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1988-1994 in temperate coniferous forest in Washington state, USA (Zabowski et al. 2000) found that removing, chopping or burning woody debris had mixed effects on the growth of planted Douglas-fir Pseudotsuga menziesii and lodgepole pine Pinus contorta seedlings. The average total height growth of both species was lower in cleared than control plots and highest following a spring burn (piled: 61 cm; autumn burn: 66; chopped: 71; pulled off site: 71; piled and burned: 72; control: 75; spring burn: 90). In 1989, seven treatment plots (0.3-3.2 ha) were established in each of four sites: control (untreated); woody debris pulled off site (using a cable system); chopped (debris mechanically chopped); debris piled and burned; debris piled; spring burn (low intensity spring broadcast-burn); autumn burn (low-to-medium intensity autumn broadcast-burn). All plots were clearcut in 1988 and planted with Douglas-fir or lodgepole pine seedlings in 1990. The height of 100 seedlings in each plot was measured at the end of the first and fifth growing seasons.