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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Influence of conventional and chemical thinning on stand structure and diversity of plant and mammal communities in young lodgepole pine forest

Published source details

Sullivan T.P., Sullivan D.S., Lindgren P.M. & Boateng J.O. (2002) Influence of conventional and chemical thinning on stand structure and diversity of plant and mammal communities in young lodgepole pine forest. Forest Ecology and Management, 170, 173-187


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use herbicides to thin trees Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1993-1998 in temperate lodgepole pine Pinus contorta forest in British Columbia, Canada (Sullivan et al. 2002) found no effect of using herbicide to thin lodgepole pine on total tree density or on total plant species richness. There was no effect of herbicide on the number of trees (herbicide: 4,180; control: 7,648/ha) or number of plants species (herbicide: 24; control: 23/treatment unit). Data were collected in 1998 in herbicide (using glyphosate herbicide to retain 1,000 stems/ha) and control treatment units (2-13 ha). Units were established in 1993 in each of three study areas.

 

Thin trees within forests: effects on mature trees Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1993-1998 in temperate lodgepole pine Pinus contorta forest in British Columbia, Canada (Sullivan et al. 2002) found no effect of lodgepole pine thinning on total tree density. The number of trees/ha was similar in thinned (3,259) and unthinned plots (7,648) Data were collected in 1998 in only three thinned (targeted to retain 1,000 stems/ha) and three unthinned treatment units (1.8-12.6 ha) established in 1993 in each of three study areas

Thin trees within forests: effects on understory plants Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1993-1998 in temperate lodgepole pine Pinus contorta forest in British Columbia, Canada (Sullivan et al. 2002) found no effect of lodgepole pine thinning on total plant species richness. The number of plant species/treatment unit was similar between treatments (thinned: 22; unthinned: 23). Data were collected in 1998 in thinned (targeted to retain 1,000 stems/ha) and unthinned treatment units (1.8-12.6 ha) established in 1993 in each of three study areas.