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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Stand development and growth responses of 1-and 3-year-old natural upland hardwoods to silvicultural treatments

Published source details

Schuler J.L. & Robison D.J. (2006) Stand development and growth responses of 1-and 3-year-old natural upland hardwoods to silvicultural treatments. Forest ecology and management, 232, 124-134


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Use fertilizer Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1999-2003 in Piedmont forest in North Carolina, USA (4) found that applying fertilizer increased the height and diameter of young trees. At one site trees in fertilized plots were taller (fertilized: 133-137 cm; unfertilized: 103-119 cm) and had greater diameters (fertilized: 13-16 mm; unfertilized: 10-12 mm) than unfertilized plots three years after clearcutting. At the second site there was no difference in tree height (fertilized: 63-71 cm; unfertilized: 63-77 cm) or diameter (fertilized: 9 mm; unfertilized: 9-10 mm) in fertilized and unfertilized plots three years after clearcutting.  However, after five years, height (fertilized: 205-212 cm; unfertilized: 154-155 cm) and diameter (fertilized: 21-23 mm; unfertilized: 18-19 mm) were higher in fertilized plots. Data were collected in 2000-2003 in 16 fertilized (phosphorus and potassium at 100 kg/ha each in 1999 and 2001) and 16 unfertilized plots (10 m2) at each of two sites. The first site was clearcut in 1998-1999, the second in 1996-1997.