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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Understory responses to fire and artificial seeding in an eastern Cascades Abies grandis forest, USA

Published source details

Schoennagel T.L. & Waller D.M. (1999) Understory responses to fire and artificial seeding in an eastern Cascades Abies grandis forest, USA. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 29, 1393-1401


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Sow tree seeds after wildfire Forest Conservation

A controlled study in 1994-1996 in temperate coniferous forest in Washington State, USA (Schoennagel & Waller 1999) found that spreading seeds in burnt forest areas decreased the number and cover of native species. The number of native plants species (unseeded: 17; seeded: 15/m2) and their cover (unseeded: 41%; seeded: 21%) were lower in seeded plots. Total plant cover was similar between treatments (unseeded: 41%; seeded: 48%). Thirty-two plots (15 × 15 m) were established in each control (unseeded) and seeded area (seeded in September 1994 with seed mix containing 80% annual grass, 15%, short-lived perennial species and 5%  nitrogen-fixing legumes). Both areas (7 ha) burned in July 1994. Data were collected two years after seeding in eight quadrats (1 m2) in each plot.