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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of prescribed fire and thinning on the spatial heterogeneity of the seed bank in a mixed oak forest

Published source details

Schelling L.R. & McCarthy B.C. (2007) Effects of prescribed fire and thinning on the spatial heterogeneity of the seed bank in a mixed oak forest. Natural Areas Journal, 27, 320-331


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forests: effects on understory plants Forest Conservation

A replicated randomized, controlled study in 2000-2004 in temperate broadleaf forest in Ohio, USA (Schelling & McCarthy 2007) found no effect of thinning on soil seed-bank species richness or diversity. Total numbers of species (thinned: 37; unthinned: 38) and Shannon's index of diversity (thinned: 3.03; unthinned: 3.11) were similar between treatments. In autumn to winter 2000-2001, ten plots (20 × 50 m) were established within each thinned (retaining ~13.75 m2/ha basal area) and unthinned treatments (20 ha) replicated at each of two sites. Species richness and diversity were determined by monitoring emerging seeds in 10 soil samples (1000 cm3) extracted from each plot in summer 2004.

 

Use prescribed fire: effect on understory plants Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2000-2004 in temperate broadleaf forest in Ohio, USA (Schelling & McCarthy 2007) found no effect of burning on soil seed-bank species richness or diversity. The total number of species (burned: 43; unburned: 38/1000 cm3 soil) as well as diversity (Shannon's index burned: 3.23; unburned: 3.11) were similar between treatments. Ten plots (20 × 50 m) were established within each burned (prescribed burned in spring 2001) and control (unburned) treatments (20 ha) at each of two sites. Species richness and diversity were determined by monitoring emerging seeds in ten soil samples (1,000 cm3) extracted from each plot in summer 2004.