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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Value of selectively cut deciduous forest for understory herb conservation: an experimental assessment

Published source details

Reader R. & Bricker B. (1992) Value of selectively cut deciduous forest for understory herb conservation: an experimental assessment. Forest Ecology and Management, 51, 317-327


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forests: effects on understory plants Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1985-1988 in boreal forest in Ontario, Canada (Reader & Bricker 1992) found that thinninging decreased the number of herbaceous species and the frequency of occurrence of each species. In large plots (0.05 and 0.2 ha), the percentage of herbaceous species that decreased in frequency was higher in uncut (34%-36%) than in 33% tree removal (16-18%) and 66% tree removal plots(18-21%). In contrast, in small plots (0.1 ha), figures were higher in uncut (37%) and 33% tree removal plots (36%) than 66% tree removal plots (12%). The percentage of herbaceous species lost was similar between treatments (uncut: 9-13%; 33% removal: 4-12%; 66% removal: 8-12%). Three plots (0.01, 0.05 and 0.20 ha) of each treatment were replicated five times: uncut, 33% tree removal and 66% tree removal (0%, 33%, and 66% of basal area removed). Treatments were applied in 1985-1986. Data were collected two years after treatments.