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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Six years of plant community development after clearcut harvesting in western Washington

Published source details

Peter D.H. & Harrington C. (2009) Six years of plant community development after clearcut harvesting in western Washington. Canadian journal of forest research, 39, 308-319


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Apply herbicides after restoration planting Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1999-2006 in temperate coniferous forest in Washington State, USA (1) found that controlling vegetation using herbicides after restoration planting decreased plant species richness and diversity. Species richness (control: 24; herbicide: 17) and diversity (Simpson's index control: 0.83; herbicide: 0.35) were lower in treated plots. Data were collected in 2006 in two plots (30 × 85 m) of each control and herbicide (annual herbicide applications) treatments in each of four blocks that had been clearcut in 1999. In all plots tree trunks were removed and Douglas-fir Pseudotsuga menziesii seedlings were planted in 2000.

 

Remove woody debris after timber harvest Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1999-2006 in temperate coniferous forest in Washington State, USA (Peter & Harrington 2009) found no effect of removing all woody material after clearcutting on plant species richness and diversity compared with removing only tree trunks. Species richness (trunk removal: 17; complete-removal: 16) and diversity (Simpson's index: trunk removal: 0.36; complete removal: 0.27) were similar between treatments. Data were collected in 2006 in two plots (30 × 85 m) of each treatment, trunk removal only and removal of all woody material. Treatments applied after clearcutting in 1999 in each of four blocks. In all plots Douglas-fir Pseudotsuga menziesii seedlings were planted in 2000 and vegetation-control herbicide was applied annually.