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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Partial cutting can enhance epiphyte conservation in temperate oak-rich forests

Published source details

Nordén B., Paltto H., Claesson C. & Götmark F. (2012) Partial cutting can enhance epiphyte conservation in temperate oak-rich forests. Forest Ecology and Management, 270, 35-44


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forests: effects on non-vascular plants Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 2000-2009 in boreal forest in Sweden (Nordén et al. 2012) found that thinning prevented a decrease in the number of lichen species, but not of mosses. The change in total number of epiphyte species/plot was negative in unthinned (-3.3) and different than in thinned (1.0), as well as number of lichen species (unthinned: -3.3; thinned: 0.0). The change in the number of bryophytes species was similar (0.1-0.8 species/plot) between treatments. Epiphytes were recorded before and after treatment (2001 and 2009) on five oak trunks in each plot (1 ha). There were 24 pairs of thinned (25% of tree basal area removed in 2002-2003) and unthinned plots.