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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The effect of shelterwood logging on the diversity of plant species in a beech (Fagus crenata) forest in Japan

Published source details

Nagaike T., Kamitani T. & Nakashizuka T. (1999) The effect of shelterwood logging on the diversity of plant species in a beech (Fagus crenata) forest in Japan. Forest Ecology and Management, 118, 161-171


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forests: effects on young trees Forest Conservation

A replicated controlled study in 1996-1997 in Japanese beech Fagus crenata forest in Japan (Nagaike, Kamitani & Nakashizuka 1999) found that thinning increased the number of new tree stems. The number of new stems/ha (thinned: 686; unthinned: 413) was higher in thinned than unthinned plots. Data were collected in 1997 in 60 quadrats (5 × 5 m) in each of 17 thinned (30–70% by volume of the trees cut 10 years before measurements) and five unthinned plots (10 × 150 m).

 

Thin trees within forests: effects on understory plants Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1996-1997 in Japanese beech Fagus crenata forest in Japan (Nagaike, Kamitani & Nakashizuka 1999) found that thinning increased the occurrence of dwarf bamboo Sasa sp. The percentage occurrence of dwarf bamboo was higher in thinned plots (thinned: 59%; unthinned: 44%). Data were collected in 1997 in 60 quadrats (5 × 5 m) in each of 17 thinned (30–70% by volume of the trees cut 10 years before measurements) and five unthinned plots (10 × 150 m).