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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Structural patterns and biodiversity in burned and managed Aleppo pine stands

Published source details

Moy D., De Las Heras J., López-Serrano F., Condes S. & Alberdi I. (2009) Structural patterns and biodiversity in burned and managed Aleppo pine stands. Plant ecology, 200, 217-228


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees after wildfire Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1999-2005 in temperate coniferous forest in Spain (Moyas et al. 2009) found that after wildfire some but not all pruning and thinning treatments increased shrub species richness, but treatments had no effect on shrub species cover. At one site, the number of shrub species/was lower in untreated (4/10 m transect) than in two out of nine treatments (7) and similar to the other seven treatments (4-7).  At the second site numbers of shrub species was lower in untreated (4) than in one out of seven treatments (10) and similar to the other seven treatments (6-8). Shrub cover was similar between treatments at both the first (untreated: 40%; treatments: 30-70%) and second site (untreated: 8%; treatments: 6-30%). In 1999, three untreated and 27 treatment plots (10 × 15 m) were established at one site, and three untreated and 21 treatment plots of similar size were established at a second site. All plots were burned by wildfire in summer 1994. Treatments included different combinations of pruning and thinning (reducing density to 800-1,600 trees/ha) in 1999 and 2004. Data were collected in June 2005 along a 10 m transect in each plot.