Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Responses of northern red oak seedlings to lime and deer exclosure fencing in Pennsylvania

Published source details

Long R.P., Brose P.H. & Horsley S.B. (2012) Responses of northern red oak seedlings to lime and deer exclosure fencing in Pennsylvania. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 42, 698-709


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Add lime to the soil after tree planting Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2004-2009 in temperate broadleaf forest in Pennsylvania, USA (Long, Brose & Horsley 2012) found no effect of lime addition on the growth of planted seedlings of northern red oak Quercus rubra. Seedling height (16-33 cm) and root-collar diameter (6.5-9.5 mm) were similar between treatments. Data were collected in 2009 in two plots (12.5 × 8.5 m) of each treatment: 0, 4.5, 9.0 and 13.5 x 103kg /ha lime application rates (applied in May 2004) at each of five sites. All plots were partially thinned (shelterwood harvest) within the past 12 years and were planted with northern red oak seedlings in April 2004.

 

Fence to prevent grazing after tree planting Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2004-2009 in temperate broadleaf forest in Pennsylvania, USA (Long, Brose & Horsley 2012) found that deer exclusion increased the size of planted northern red oak Quercus rubra seedlings. Seedling height (fenced: 33 cm; unfenced: 16 cm) and root-collar diameter (fenced: 9.5 mm; unfenced: 6.5) were higher in fenced plots. Data were collected in 2009 in four fenced (2.4 m tall wire to exclude deer in 2002-2004) and four unfenced plots (12.5 × 8.5 m) at each of five sites. All plots were partially thinned (shelterwood harvest) within the past 12 years and were planted with northern red oak seedlings in Apr 2004.