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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Canopy tree growth responses following selection harvest in seven species varying in shade tolerance

Published source details

Jones T.A., Domke G.M. & Thomas S.C. (2009) Canopy tree growth responses following selection harvest in seven species varying in shade tolerance. Canadian journal of forest research, 39, 430-440


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Log/remove trees within forests: effects on mature trees Forest Conservation

A replicated, study in 2004 in temperate broadleaf forest in Ontario, Canada (Jones, Domke & Thomas 2009) found that selective harvest increased the growth rate of shade-tolerant tree species. Annual increase of stem diameter (mm) for stems of the shade-tolerant species sugar maple Acer saccharum (Before: 1.3; after: 1.4), American beech Fagus grandifolia (Before: 1.3; after: 1.7) and eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis (Before: 1.4; after: 1.6) was higher 4-15 years after harvest than in the five years before harvest. In contrast,  for the other less shade-tolerant species black  cherry Prunus serotina, white spruce Picea glauca, red maple Acer rubrum and yellow birch Betula alleghaniensis), stem diameter increase was similar between the two time-periods (1.2-1.6 mm/year). Annual increase of stem diameter was calculated by measuring stem cores extracted in 2004 from 4,127 trees in 174 plots representing nine years of harvest (retaining 15-18 m2/ha basal area): 1984, 1989, 1992, 1994, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003. There were 16-20 plots for each harvest year.