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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Responses of tree seedlings to the removal of Chromolaena odorata Linn. in a degraded forest in Ghana

Published source details

Honu Y. & Dang Q. (2000) Responses of tree seedlings to the removal of Chromolaena odorata Linn. in a degraded forest in Ghana. Forest Ecology and Management, 137, 75-82


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Mechanically/manually remove invasive plants Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1998 in dry semi-deciduous forest in Ghana (Honu & Dang 2000) found that clearance of invasive Siam weed Chromolaena odorata increased the seedling height and number of leaves for 23 out of 25 native tree species. For 25 out of 28 tree species height increases (removed: 2-14 cm; control 1-3 cm) and numbers of leaves/individual (removed: 1-8; control: 1-3) were higher in removal plots. In contrast, for the other three species, increases in height (2-4 cm) and numbers of leaves (1-2 leaves/individual) were similar between treatments. In May-June 1998, removal (Siam weed and all other non-tree plants removed) and control (no plant removal) treatments were applied to 54 circular plots each (1.3 m radius). A second weed removal was carried out in July 1998. Increases in height and numbers of leaves for tree seedlings ≤2 m tall were calculated from the difference between measurements taken in June (after the first removal) and September 1998.