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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Ten-year responses of ponderosa pine growth, vigor, and recruitment to restoration treatments in the Bitterroot Mountains, Montana, USA

Published source details

Fajardo A., Graham J.M., Goodburn J.M. & Fiedler C.E. (2007) Ten-year responses of ponderosa pine growth, vigor, and recruitment to restoration treatments in the Bitterroot Mountains, Montana, USA. Forest Ecology and Management, 243, 50-60


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use thinning followed by prescribed fire Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 2003-2005 in temperate coniferous forest in Montana USA (Fajardo et al. 2007) found no effect of selection cutting followed by spring prescribed burning  on tree growth rate. Tree basal area increase overten years was not significantly different between thinned and burned (107 cm2) and untreated plots (75 cm2). One thinned and burned plot (selection cutting followed by spring prescribed burning in 1992-1993) and one untreated plot (50 × 50 to 60 × 60 m) were established at each of three sites. Trees were measured in 1992-1993 and again in 2003.

 

Log/remove trees within forests: effects on mature trees Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 2003-2005 in temperate coniferous forest in Montana USA (Fajardo et al. 2007) found that selective cutting increased the growth rate of trees. Tree basal area increase in ten years was higher in cut (137 cm2) than in uncut plots (75 cm2). One cut plot (modified individual tree selection cutting in 1992-1993) and one uncut plot (50 × 50 to 60 × 60 m) was established at each of three sites. Trees were measured in 1992-1993 and again in 2003.