Study

Differential responses of plants, reptiles and birds to grazing management, fertilizer and tree clearing

  • Published source details Dorrough J., McIntyre S., Brown G., Stol J., Barrett G. & Brown A. (2012) Differential responses of plants, reptiles and birds to grazing management, fertilizer and tree clearing. Austral Ecology, 37, 569-582.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Modify grazing regime: Forest, open woodland & savanna

Action Link
Reptile Conservation

Shorten livestock grazing period or control grazing season in forests

Action Link
Forest Conservation

Use clearcutting to increase understory diversity

Action Link
Forest Conservation
  1. Modify grazing regime: Forest, open woodland & savanna

    A paired, site comparison study in 2006–2007 in grassy woodland and agricultural land in south eastern Australia (Dorrough et al. 2012) found that rotational grazing did not increase reptile abundance compared to continuous grazing. Reptile abundance was similar in rotationally grazed plots (2.0 reptiles/ha) compared to continuously grazed plots (1.7 reptiles/ha), but greater in grazed plot with trees (3.6 reptiles/ha) than in grazed native pasture plots (1.4 reptiles/ha) regardless of grazing system. Twelve pairs of farms of with either rotational or continuous grazing (cattle or sheep) on native pastures were selected. Rotational grazing systems (four or more paddocks grazed for <56 days at a time followed by at least 21 days of rest with more rest time than grazing time) had operated for at least five years. Paddocks on continuous grazing farms were stocked for >6 months a year. Reptiles were surveyed in two 1 ha plots/farm (one in treed and one in cleared pastureland, 48 plots in total) using coverboards and active searches in December 2006, March 2007 and October 2007.

    (Summarised by: Katie Sainsbury)

  2. Shorten livestock grazing period or control grazing season in forests

    A paired-sites study in 2006 in temperate woodland in south-eastern Australia (Dorrough et al. 2012) found no effect of different grazing regimes on native plant species richness. The number of native plant species/plot was similar between treatments (continuous-grazing: 18; rotational-grazing: 15). Monitoring was in two continuous-grazing (livestock had unrestricted access) and two rotational-grazing (<56 days grazing followed by >21 days with no grazing) plots (1 ha) in each of 12 sites (a total of 48 plots).

  3. Use clearcutting to increase understory diversity

    A replicated, controlled study in 2006 in temperate woodland in south-eastern Australia (Dorrough et al. 2012) found no effect of clearcutting on native plant species richness. Numbers of native plant species/plot was similar between treatments (clearcut: 15; control: 19). Monitoring was in two pairs of clearcut and adjacent control plots (1 ha) in each of 12 sites (a total of 48 plots).

     

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