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Individual study: Fuel mass and forest structure following stand-replacement fire and post-fire logging in a mixed-evergreen forest

Published source details

Donato D.C., Fontaine J.B., Kauffman J.B., Robinson W.D. & Law B.E. (2013) Fuel mass and forest structure following stand-replacement fire and post-fire logging in a mixed-evergreen forest. International Journal of Wildland Fire, 22, 652-666


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Thin trees after wildfire Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 2004-2006 in temperate mixed forest in Oregon, USA ( Donato et al. 2013) found that thinning decreased the biomass of live and dead plants in burnt forest areas. Total dead organic matter was higher in unlogged than in moderate and high-intensity logged plots in both moist (unlogged: 709; moderate-intensity: 355; high-intensity: 244 kg x 103/ha) and dry forest units (unlogged: 435; moderate-intensity: 182; high-intensity: 161 kg x 103/ha). Total live biomass was higher in unlogged and moderate-intensity than in high intensity treatments in moist forest units (unlogged: 5.6; moderate-intensity: 7.3; high-intensity: 1.6 kg x 103/ha). Total live biomass was similar in all treatments in dry forest units (unlogged: 4.9; moderate-intensity: 4.9; high-intensity: 2.8 kg x 103/ha). The whole study area was burnt by wildfire in 2002. A 1 ha plot was established in each of eight unlogged, seven moderate-intensity logged (25-75% basal area cut) and six high-intensity logged (>75% basal area cut) moist forest treatment units, as well as three unlogged, three moderate-intensity and three high-intensity logged dry forest treatment units (average 8 ha). Logging occurred in 2004-2006. Data were collected 3-9 months after treatments.