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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The response of native species to removal of invasive exotic grasses in a seasonally dry Hawaiian woodland

Published source details

D'Antonio C.M., Hughes R.F., Mack M., Hitchcock D. & Vitousek P.M. (1998) The response of native species to removal of invasive exotic grasses in a seasonally dry Hawaiian woodland. Journal of Vegetation Science, 9, 699-712


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Mechanically/manually remove invasive plants Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1991-1994 in dry tropical forest in Hawaii, USA (D'Antonio et al. 2010) found that removal of invasive grass species increased the relative growth rate and biomass of two of four native shrubs. For hopbrush Dodonaea viscosa and Hawaiian hawthorn Osteomeles anthyllidifolia changes in basal circumference (removal: 13% and 13%; control: 7% and 5%, respectively) and biomass (removal: 33% and 40%; control: 12% and 13%, respectively) were higher in removal than control plots. For maiele Styphelia tameiameia and Metrosideros polymorpha changes in basal circumference (removal: 5% and 9%; control: 4% and 9%, respectively) and biomass (removal: 10% and 3%; control: 6% and 2%, respectively) were similar between treatments. Trees of the four dominant shrub species were monitored in three control (untreated) and four removal (all introduced grasses removed) plots (20 × 20 m) established in spring 1991. Data was collected in 1992 and 1994.