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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Slow responses of understory plants of maple-dominated forests to white-tailed deer experimental exclusion

Published source details

Collard A., Lapointe L., Ouellet J., Crête M., Lussier A., Daigle C. & Côté S.D. (2010) Slow responses of understory plants of maple-dominated forests to white-tailed deer experimental exclusion. Forest Ecology and Management, 260, 649-662


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Use wire fencing to exclude large native herbivores Forest Conservation

A replicated, paired-sites, before-and-after trial study in 1998-2006 in temperate broadleaf forest in Quebec, Canada (Collard et al. 2010) found that excluding deer  increased the above ground biomass of spring-flowering herbaceous species, small seedlings and large shrubs and trees, but not of summer-flowering herbaceous species, grasses, ferns and small deciduous shrubs. Eight years after treatments, the above ground biomass of small and large spring-flowering herbaceous species had increased by 119% and -19% in grazed plots and 570% and 89% in ungrazed plots respectively. The biomass of small deciduous seedlings had decreased by 63% in grazed and 18% in ungrazed plots. The biomass of large deciduous shrubs and trees had increased by 99% in grazed and 418% in ungrazed plots. Excluding deer did not affect above ground biomass of summer-flowering herbaceous species, grasses, ferns and small deciduous shrubs. Six sites of two 625 m2 treatment plots: grazed (control) and ungrazed (deer exclosure) were established in 1998. Above ground biomass (g/m2) was estimated in 1998 and 2006 in twenty 2 × 0.1 m subplots in each plot.