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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of disturbance intensity on species and functional diversity in a tropical forest

Published source details

Carreño‐Rocabado G., Peña‐Claros M., Bongers F., Alarcón A., Licona J. & Poorter L. (2012) Effects of disturbance intensity on species and functional diversity in a tropical forest. Journal of Ecology, 100, 1453-1463


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Log/remove trees within forests: effects on mature trees Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled, before-and-after study in 2000-2008 in tropical forest in Bolivia (Carreño-Rocabado et al. 2012) found no effect of logging followed by silviculture treatments on tree species richness or diversity. There was no difference between before and eight years after treatments in numbers of species/ha (unharvested: 123-122; normal logging: 132-125; light-silviculture: 130-131; intensive-silviculture: 128-130) or diversity (Shannon's index unharvested: -3.06; normal: -0.27; light-silviculture: -0.71; intensive-silviculture: -1.26). Four 27 ha plots were randomly assigned to four treatments: unharvested; normal logging (logging using reduced-impact logging techniques); light-silviculture (logging plus light silviculture); and intensive-silviculture (double logging intensity plus intensive silviculture). Trees were monitored in 2000 and 2008 (before and after treatments) in four 1 ha subplots within each treatment plot.