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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Responses of boreal epiphytic bryophytes to different levels of partial canopy harvest This paper is one of a selection of papers published as part of the special Schofield Gedenkschrift

Published source details

Caners R.T., Macdonald S.E. & Belland R.J. (2010) Responses of boreal epiphytic bryophytes to different levels of partial canopy harvest This paper is one of a selection of papers published as part of the special Schofield Gedenkschrift. Botany, 88, 315-328


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forests: effects on non-vascular plants Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1998-2004 in boreal forest in Alberta, Canada (Caners, Macdonald & Belland 2010) found that thinning treatments decreased species richness and abundance of non-vascular plants that grow on other plants. Numbers of species was the lowest in 10% and 50% canopy retention sites (5/tree), intermediate and similar to the other treatments in the 75% canopy retention sites (6) and highest in unharvested sites (8). The abundance was lower in 10, 50 and 75% canopy retention sites (present in 19, 21 and 25% of sampling points respectively) than in unharvested sites (50% of sampling points). In 2004, six to eight trees were sampled in each of four harvesting treatments (10 ha): 10%, 50% and 75% canopy retention and unharvested, randomly applied in 1998-1999 in each of three sites (a total of 80 trees).