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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of microsite, water, weeding, and direct seeding on the regeneration of native and alien species within a Hawaiian dry forest preserve

Published source details

Cabin R.J., Weller S.G., Lorence D.H., Cordell S. & Hadway L.J. (2002) Effects of microsite, water, weeding, and direct seeding on the regeneration of native and alien species within a Hawaiian dry forest preserve. Biological Conservation, 104, 181-190


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Water plants to preserve dry tropical forest species Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1998-2000 in tropical dry forest in Hawaii, USA (Cabin et al. 2002) found that irrigation increased the abundance and biomass of most forest plants. Average biomass and density were higher in watered than in control plots for: all species (watered: 355 g/m2, 28 individuals/m2; control: 28 g/m2, 23 individuals/m2), for native species (watered: 129 g/m2, 16 individuals/m2; control: 7 g/m2, 11 individuals/m2) and for seeded species (watered: 34 g/m2, 7 individuals/m2; control: 1 g/m2, <1 individuals/m2). For non-seeded species average biomass was higher in watered (95 g/m2) than in control plots (6 g/m2), while density was lower in watered plots (watered: 9; control: 11 individuals/m2). Thirty two plots (1 m2) of each treatment: watered (20 litre/plot, three times a week for the first six months, once a week thereafter) and control (not-watered) were established in 1998. Each plot was sown with 60 seeds of shrubs and trees. Plants biomass and density was measured 21 months after treatment.