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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Influence of deer, cattle grazing and timber harvest on plant species diversity in a longleaf pine bluestem ecosystem

Published source details

Brockway D.G. & Lewis C.E. (2003) Influence of deer, cattle grazing and timber harvest on plant species diversity in a longleaf pine bluestem ecosystem. Forest ecology and management, 175, 49-69


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Use wire fencing to exclude large native herbivores Forest Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled, study in 1977-1981 in a subtropical moist lowland forest in Alabama, USA (Brockway & Lewis 2003) found that excluding deer and cattle had no effect on plant cover, species richness or diversity after four growing seasons. Plant cover were 135, 132 and 138, numbers of species were 29, 29, 29 and species diversities (Shannon’s index) were 2.37, 2.41 and 2.46 for ungrazed, deer-grazed and cattle-and-deer-grazed treatments respectively. Three 900 ha allotments, each containing six 150 ha blocks were established in 1977. Three treatments were randomly assigned to three 0.1 ha plots within each block: grazing by deer and cattle excluded, grazing by deer only and grazing by deer and cattle. Plant data were collected in September and October 1978–1981 along three 20 m line transects within each treatment plot.