Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of thinning on structural development in 40-to 100-year-old Douglas-fir stands in western Oregon

Published source details

Bailey J.D. & Tappeiner J.C. (1998) Effects of thinning on structural development in 40-to 100-year-old Douglas-fir stands in western Oregon. Forest Ecology and Management, 108, 99-113


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forests: effects on young trees Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled, paired site study in 1993–1995 in temperate coniferous Douglas-fir Pseudotsuga menziesii forest in western Oregon, USA (Bailey & Tappeiner 1998) found that thinning increased conifer seedling density. Tree seedling density in thinned forest segments (1,433/ha) was greater than in unthinned forest segments (233/ha). Monitoring was in 1993–1995 in 32 pairs of thinned (between 1969 and 1984) and unthinned sites that had regenerated naturally following harvest between 1880 and 1940. Undisturbed old-growth Douglas-fir stands (>200 years) were present for comparison on 20 of the 32 paired sites.