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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: First decadal response to treatment in a disturbance-based silviculture experiment in Maine

Published source details

Arseneault J.E., Saunders M.R., Seymour R.S. & Wagner R.G. (2011) First decadal response to treatment in a disturbance-based silviculture experiment in Maine. Forest Ecology and Management, 262, 404-412


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use group-selection harvesting Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 1995-2007 in mixed conifer and broadleaf temperate forest in Maine, USA (Arseneault et al. 2011) found that two group-selection harvesting treatments affected tree annual growth rates differently, but neither differed from the uncut control. Average basal area annual growth was higher in the large group (0.27 m2/ha) than small group treatment (−0.05 m2/ha). There was no difference in average basal area annual growth between any of the group-selection treatments and the uncut treatment (−0.09 m2/ha). Three treatments were replicated at three different sites: large-group (trees removed from 20% of the area creating 1,000-2,000 m2 gaps); small-group (trees removed from 10% of the area creating 500-1,000 m2 gaps); and uncut. Treatments were applied in 1995-1997. Monitoring was in 2005-2007 in 20 plots (0.05 ha) randomly selected in each treatment.