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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Quercus calliprinos regrowth advantage under grazing in Mediterranean maquis and its management implications

Published source details

Agra H. & Ne’eman G. (2011) Quercus calliprinos regrowth advantage under grazing in Mediterranean maquis and its management implications. Forest ecology and management, 261, 143-147


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use wire fences within grazing areas to exclude livestock from specific forest sections Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled, paired sites study in 2006-2009 in Mediterranean-type shrubland in Israel (Agra & Ne'eman 2011) found that excluding cattle grazing increased the size of regenerating trees after clear cutting. Three years after clear cutting the average height and diameter of regenerating  hawthorn Crataegus aronia, terebinth Pistacia palaestina, Boissier oak Quercus boissieri and Palestine oak Q. calliprinos trees were higher in fenced (height: 210; diameter:230 cm) than in grazed plots (height: 70; diameter:110 cm). In 2006, all trees were clearcut in five pairs of grazed (exposed to grazing livestock, 0.3 cows/ha) and fenced (wire fenced in 2005) plots (0.1 ha). Trees were measured in 2009.