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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Woody species as landscape modulators: their effect on the herbaceous plants in a Mediterranean maquis

Published source details

Agra H. & Ne’eman G. (2009) Woody species as landscape modulators: their effect on the herbaceous plants in a Mediterranean maquis. Plant Ecology, 205, 165-177


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use wire fences within grazing areas to exclude livestock from specific forest sections Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 2005-2007 in Mediterranean-type shrubland in Israel (Agra & Ne'eman 2009) found no effect of cattle exclusion on herbaceous plant species richness. The number of herbaceous species/plot was similar between grazed and fenced under tree canopies (grazed: 19; fenced: 17) and in open areas (grazed: 82; fenced: 78). In April 2007 herbaceous species were monitored under tree canopies and in open areas in five plots where grazing had been excluded using wire fences (during December 2005) and five grazed plots (0.1 ha; 0.3 cows/ha).

 

Use clearcutting to increase understory diversity Forest Conservation

A replicated, controlled, study in 2005-2007 in Mediterranean-type shrubland in Israel (Agra & Ne'eman 2009) found that clearcutting increased herbaceous species richness under tree canopies. Numbers of herbaceous species/0.1 ha plot was higher in clearcut (81) than in uncut plots (18). Ten uncut and ten clearcut plots (0.1 ha) were established in December 2005. In April 2007, herbaceous species were monitored in uncut and in clearcut plots in areas that were covered with tree canopy before treatment.