Study

Establishment of Eucalyptus gomphocephala (Tuart) woodland species in an abandoned limestone quarry: effects after 12 years

  • Published source details Ruthrof K., Bell R. & Calver M. (2009) Establishment of Eucalyptus gomphocephala (Tuart) woodland species in an abandoned limestone quarry: effects after 12 years. Pacific Conservation Biology, 15, 278-286.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Improve soil quality after tree planting (excluding applying fertilizer)

Action Link
Forest Conservation

Use fertilizer after tree planting

Action Link
Forest Conservation

Use fertilizer

Action Link
Forest Conservation
  1. Improve soil quality after tree planting (excluding applying fertilizer)

    A randomized, replicated, controlled study in 1995–2007 in a limestone quarry in Western Australia (Ruthrof, Bell & Calver 2009) found that adding a variety of soil enhancers together to the soil did not increase the survival, height, diameter or health of tree seedlings. Experiment one found that three soil enhancers did not affect survival (no data), height (soil enhancers: 0.06–7m; untreated: 4.4–5.2 m), diameter (soil enhancers: 0.3–12.9 cm; untreated: 4.6–7.8 cm) or health class (soil enhancers: 2–5; untreated: 3–4.4) of tuart Eucalyptus gomphocephala and Limestone Marlock E. decipiens seedlings. Experiment two found that adding three soil enhancers with fertiliser tablets did not affect survival (no data), height (soil enhancers: 1.6–6 m; untreated: 1.6–6.8 m), diameter (soil enhancers: 1.5–6.5 cm; untreated: 2–7.9 cm) or health (soil enhancers: 2.3–5; untreated: 3.5–4.5) of tuart, Limestone Marlock and coojong Acacia saligna seedlings. Experiment one consisted of four blocks each containing six plots (6 × 10 m). Experiment two consisted of four blocks each with four plots (5 × 6 m). In experiment one, treated plots received all but one of the following treatments: fertiliser tablets, added topsoil, sewage sludge and micronutrients (details see paper). In experiment two, treated plots received all four treatments. Half the plots in each experiment received one application of broadcast fertilizer (superphosphate: 400 kg/ha and potassium chloride: 100 kg/ha). Five seedlings of each species were planted/plot. After 12 years, the survival, height, diameter and health class (index based on stress, herbivory and nutrient deficiencies, 1: dead; 5: healthy) of all seedlings was assessed.

     

  2. Use fertilizer after tree planting

    A replicated, controlled, randomized study in 1995–2007 in a limestone quarry in Western Australia (Ruthrof, Bell & Calver 2009) found that adding fertilizer to the soil did not increase the survival, height, diameter or health of tree seedlings. One experiment found that the fertilizer did not affect survival (no data), height (fertilized: 3.2–4.9 m; unfertilized: 4.4–5.2 m), diameter (fertilized: 0.3–12.9 cm; unfertilized: 4.6–7.8 cm) or health class (fertilized: 4–5; unfertilized: 3–4.4) of tuart Eucalyptus gomphocephala and limestone marlock E. decipiens seedlings. Another experiment found that the fertilizer did not affect survival (no data), height (fertilized: 1.6–6 m; unfertilized: 1.6–6.8 m), diameter (fertilized: 2.8–6.2 cm; unfertilized: 2–7.9 cm) or health (fertilized: 2.3–5; unfertilized: 3.5–4.5) of tuart, limestone marlock and coojong Acacia saligna seedlings. Experiment one consisted of four blocks each containing six plots (6 × 10 m). Experiment two consisted of four blocks each with four plots (5 × 6 m). Half of the plots in each experiment were fertilized once (superphosphate: 400 kg/ha and potassium chloride: 100 kg/ha). Five seedlings of each species were planted/plot. After 12 years, the survival, height, diameter and health class (index based on stress, herbivory and nutrient deficiencies, 1: dead; 5: healthy) of all seedlings was assessed.

     

  3. Use fertilizer

    A replicated, controlled, randomized study in 1995–2007 in a limestone quarry in Western Australia (8) found that applying fertiliser over the ground, along with a range of other soil enhancers, did not increase the number of naturally regenerated tree seedlings. After 12 years, neither fertiliser nor the three soil enhancers increased the number of seedlings in the two experiments (no data provided). Experiment one consisted of four blocks, containing six plots (6 × 10 m). Experiment two consisted of four blocks with four plots (5 × 6 m). Half of the plots in both experiments received fertiliser once (superphosphate: 400 kg/ha and potassium chloride: 100 kg/ha).  The plots treated with soil enhancers received all but one of the following treatments: fertiliser tablets, added topsoil, sewage sludge and micronutrients (see paper for details). At the end of the experiments, the number and species of naturally recruited seedlings were recorded for each plot.

     

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