Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The impact of a shade coffee certification program on forest conservation: A case study from a wild coffee forest in Ethiopia

Published source details

Takahashi R. & Todo Y. (2013) The impact of a shade coffee certification program on forest conservation: A case study from a wild coffee forest in Ethiopia. Journal of Environmental Management, 130, 48-54


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Adopt certification Forest Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2010 in highland rainforests in the Oromiya region, Ethiopia (Takahashi & Todo 2013) found that forests producing wild, shade-grown coffee Coffea arabica with a certification had a lower risk of deforestation than forests where coffee was grown without certification. Forests under a coffee certification program had a lower probability of deforestation (2.8%) than similar areas where no forest coffee was produced (4.5%). However, where coffee was grown without certification, the probability of deforestation (11.8%) did not differ from similar areas where no coffee was grown (12.4%). The study was conducted in two forests that were certified in 2007 and two forests that were considered uncertified during the study as they only received certification in 2009, just before the measurements of forest cover in 2010. Probability of deforestation was estimated using satellite images (Landsat, resolution 30 m) from 2005 and 2010.