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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Harvesting an invasive bivalve in a large natural lake: Species recovery and impacts on native benthic macroinvertebrate community structure in Lake Tahoe, USA.

Published source details

Wittmann M.E., Chandra S., Reuter J.E., Caires A., Schladow S.G. & Denton M. (2012) Harvesting an invasive bivalve in a large natural lake: Species recovery and impacts on native benthic macroinvertebrate community structure in Lake Tahoe, USA. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 22, 588-597


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Asian clams: Mechanical removal Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study conducted between 2009 and 2010 at two lake sites in North America (Wittmann et al. 2012) found that suction dredging significantly reduced the abundance of the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea compared to control (non-dredged) sites. After two weeks, density was reduced from around 1,500 to 60 clams/m2 (96% reduction). These effects lasted for at least a year. Diver-assisted suction dredging was applied in five metres water depth at two sites. The equipment had a 4 cm diameter hose, 5.5 Horse Power engine at 3,600 rpm net power output, and 196 cm3 displacement. Each site had three dredged (to 8-13 cm deep) and one un-dredged control plot of 36 m2.