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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Verwilderte Vorkommen von Lysichiton americanus Hultén & St. John (Araceae) in Duisburg und Mülheim an der Ruhr [Savaged occurrence of Lysichiton americanus Hultén & St. John (Araceae) in Duisburg and Muelheim an der Ruhr]

Published source details

Fuchs R., Kutzelnigg H., Feige B. & Keil P. (2003) Verwilderte Vorkommen von Lysichiton americanus Hultén & St. John (Araceae) in Duisburg und Mülheim an der Ruhr [Savaged occurrence of Lysichiton americanus Hultén & St. John (Araceae) in Duisburg and Muelheim an der Ruhr]. Tuexenia, 23, 7


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Skunk cabbage: Physical removal Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

A study in 2004-2008 in the Taunus region in Germany (Fuchs et al. 2003) reports that manually removing mature skunk cabbage Lysichiton americanus was not effective as plants build up a seed bank which lasts for at least eight years.  After the first four years of a twice yearly total removal programme, plants with leaf length in excess of 80cm were no longer found.  However, a large number of plants still needed to be removed each year.  In 2008, at least 3,773 skunk cabbage plants were removed in the Taunus region. The programme involved removal of all skunk cabbage stands twice each year.  No further information was available.