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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: New Forest non-native plants project report of measures undertaken to control American Skunk Cabbage during 2010

Published source details

Chatters C. (2010) New Forest non-native plants project report of measures undertaken to control American Skunk Cabbage during 2010. New Forest Plants Project, UK, 13 pp.


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Skunk cabbage: Chemical control using herbicides Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

A study in 2010, at Lymington Reedbeds, England, UK (Chatters 2010) found that herbicide sprays, glyphosate and 2, 4-D Amine, each killed skunk cabbage Lysichiton americanus.   Two months following treatment, most plants sprayed with glyphosate appeared to have been killed, whereas most of those sprayed with 2,4-D amine were found to have new shoots.  However, six months following the treatments, a limited survey did not find any skunk cabbage plants, suggesting that both herbicide applications may have been successful.  The site was divided into two sections. A larger downstream section was treated with glyphosate (Roundup Pro Biactive) at a rate of 6 litres/ha. A smaller, upstream section was treated with 2, 4-D Amine in an unspecified amount. Herbicide was applied by two people over a three day time period.  Surveys were conducted for seven to eight weeks, then six months, after application.