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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Crayfish females eavesdrop on fighting males and use smell and sight to recognize the identity of the winner

Published source details

Aquiloni L & Gherardi F (2010) Crayfish females eavesdrop on fighting males and use smell and sight to recognize the identity of the winner. Animal Behaviour, 79, 265-269


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Procambarus crayfish control: Trapping and removal Control of Freshwater Invasive Species

A controlled, replicated study conducted in 2006 in canals in Italy (Aquiloni & Gherardi 2010) found that food-baited traps were successful in capturing red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Of 282 crayfish caught using different bait types, over half were captured in food-baited traps compared with traps containing male or female crayfish and a control treatment (no bait). A total of 72 traps were set three metres apart and randomly assigned one of four bait treatments: no bait, tinned meat (food), male crayfish, or female crayfish. Bait crayfish were kept inside a wire netting box inside the traps to prevent them from mating with trapped individuals. The traps were checked after two days. The sex of each trapped crayfish was determined.