Study

Applying “Diffusion of innovation” theory and social marketing for the recovery of pileated gibbon Hylobates pileatus in North Ta-riu watershed, Khao Soi Dao wildlife sanctuary, Thailand

  • Published source details Kolasartsanee I. & Srikosamatara S. (2014) Applying “Diffusion of innovation” theory and social marketing for the recovery of pileated gibbon Hylobates pileatus in North Ta-riu watershed, Khao Soi Dao wildlife sanctuary, Thailand. Conservation Evidence, 11, 61-65.

Summary

Population density of endangered pileated gibbon Hylobates pileatus in 9 km2 of North Ta-riu watershed, located in the centre of Khao Soi Dao wildlife sanctuary, dramatically declined from 6.4 groups/km2 in 1979 to 2 groups/km2 in 2006. Opportunistic poaching during non-timber forest product (NTFP) collection and insufficient patrolling were considered the main cause of decline. An alternative strategy is needed to enhance pileated gibbon conservation. We applied diffusion of innovation theory to change and expand conservation behaviour among NTFP collectors, although this study does not endorse illegal NTFP collection. After a meeting with NTFP collectors in May 2009, a network of NTFP collectors for pileated gibbon conservation was successfully established with 16 members. The aim of the network was to abstain from poaching on pileated gibbon during NTFP collection. Interpersonal persuasion along with social marketing were used to expand the network. In December 2009, the network had expanded to 101 members. In 2012, six new groups of pileated gibbons (24% increase) were found in the North Ta-riu watershed. The density had increased to 2.8 groups/km2.

Output references
What Works 2021 cover

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust