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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Bear-proof fences reduce livestock losses in the Tibetan Autonomous Region, China

Published source details

Papworth S.K., Kang A., Rao M., Chin S.T., Zhao H., Zhao X. & Corrasco L.R. (2014) Bear-proof fences reduce livestock losses in the Tibetan Autonomous Region, China. Conservation Evidence, 11, 8-11


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install non-electric fencing to exclude predators or herbivores and reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, before-and-after study in 2008–2009 of 19 households in Tibetan Autonomous Region, China (Papworth et al. 2014) found that households fenced to exclude predators experienced fewer visits and lower rates of livestock predation by Tibetan brown bears Ursus arctos pruinosus. Results were not tested for statistical significance. In the year after fence installation, there were fewer bear visits (2.4/household) than in the year before (5.3/household). In the year after fence installation, fewer livestock were lost to bears (0.2/household) than in the year before (11.6/household). Fourteen fences were constructed around 19 households (some fences enclosed >1 household) and associated livestock in 2008. Fences were constructed of wire mesh (with mesh diagonal dimensions of ≤30 cm) and barbed wire, set on a steel frame. Each fence enclosed 120–1,000 sheep and goats. Bear visits and predation events were recorded by householders.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)