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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Managing forests with prescribed fire: Implications for a cavity-dwelling bat species

Published source details

Boyles J.G. & Aubrey D.P. (2006) Managing forests with prescribed fire: Implications for a cavity-dwelling bat species. Forest Ecology and Management, 222, 108-115


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use prescribed burning Bat Conservation

A replicated study in 2003–2004 in a deciduous forest in Missouri, USA (Boyles & Aubrey 2006) found that evening bats Nycticeius humeralis roosted only in areas of the forest where prescribed burning had occurred. Twenty-three bats were tracked to 63 tree roosts in burned areas, and no roosts were found in unburned areas. The burned area of the forest had a more open canopy and more dead trees than the unburned area. Prescribed burning began in 1999 after 50 years of fire suppression and was done every two years in March or April in 55% of the study area. Bats were caught from March 2003 to March 2004 using mist nets across forest roads between the burned and unburned areas of the 1,200 ha forest and in 2–3 ponds or roads in both areas. Twenty-three bats (11 females and 12 males) were fitted with radio-transmitters and tracked to roost trees each day until the transmitter was shed or expired.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)