Study

The value of ‘bat boxes’ for attracting hollow-dependent fauna to farm forestry plantations in southeast Queensland

  • Published source details Smith G.C. & Agnew G. (2002) The value of ‘bat boxes’ for attracting hollow-dependent fauna to farm forestry plantations in southeast Queensland. Ecological Management & Restoration, 3, 37-46.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Provide bat boxes for roosting bats

Action Link
Bat Conservation

Provide artificial dens or nest boxes on trees

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Provide bat boxes for roosting bats

    A replicated study in 1996–2000 in three farm forest plantations and one native forest in Queensland, Australia (Smith & Agnew 2002) found that 19 of 96 bat boxes (20%) were used by Gould’s long-eared bats Nyctophilus gouldi as maternity and other roosts. More bat boxes were occupied at two farm forestry sites in fragmented landscapes than in native forest (no boxes used) and one of the farm forestry sites bordering it (one box used). Approximately 20 other bat species were known to occur in the study area but did not use the bat boxes. Bat boxes were made from laminated plywood built to the British Tanglewood Wedge design (40 cm long x 20 cm wide x maximum of 18.5 cm deep). Twenty-four boxes were attached to trees at each of three sites 3 m or 6 m above the ground, evenly spaced and in different aspects. Boxes were checked 5–9 times between April 1996 and November 2000.

    (Summarised by: Anna Berthinussen)

  2. Provide artificial dens or nest boxes on trees

    A replicated study in 1996–2000 in three forest plantations and one native forest in Queensland, Australia (Smith & Agnew 2002) found that nest boxes were used by feathertail gliders Acrobates pygmaeus, sugar gliders Petaurus breviceps, squirrel gliders Petaurus norfolcensis and yellow‐footed marsupial mice Antechinus flavipes at three of four sites. Between 0 and 40% of nest boxes were occupied at each check within each of the three plantations. No boxes were used in the native forest. Out of 96 boxes, feathertail gliders used 16 (17%), sugar gliders used 10 (10%), squirrel gliders used four (4%) and yellow‐footed marsupial mice used one (1%). The study was conducted in three 2–18-year-old eucalyptus plantations (1.2–1.5 ha) and one native forest dominated by >30 year-old eucalyptus (1.8 ha). At each site, 24 boxes were attached to trees, 3 m or 6 m above ground and 2–25 m apart. Nest boxes (40 cm long, 20 cm wide, ≤18.5 cm deep) were made from laminated plywood and had a 15–20 mm wide slot at the bottom. Boxes were checked 5–9 times between April 1996 and November 2000.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

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