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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: An experimental test of gating derelict mines to conserve bat roost habitat in southeastern Australia

Published source details

Slade C.P. & Law B.S. (2008) An experimental test of gating derelict mines to conserve bat roost habitat in southeastern Australia. Acta Chiropterologica, 10, 367-376


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install and maintain gates at mine entrances to restrict public access Bat Conservation

A replicated, controlled, before-and-after study in 2003 at four derelict mines in a forested area of south-eastern Australia (Slade & Law 2008) found that installing gates with 125 mm horizontal spacing resulted in fewer eastern horseshoe bats Rhinolophus megaphyllus and Schreiber’s bats Miniopterus schreibersii using the mines and more bats aborted exit and entry flights, whereas gates with horizontal spacings of 450 mm and 300 mm did not affect bat numbers or behaviour. Fewer bats used two mines after gates with a 125 mm horizontal spacing were installed (before: 120 and 540 bats; after: 30 and 290 bats). The number of bats aborting exit and entry flights also significantly increased (data reported as standardized results). Gates with horizontal spacings of 450 mm and 300 mm did not significantly affect bat numbers or behaviour. Bat numbers at two similar control mines either remained constant or increased. Two mines were fitted with gates (made from 20 mm plastic tubing), and two were left ungated (controls). In March–April 2003, bat activity at the two experimental mines was observed in four stages of 11 days each: before gating followed by the successive addition of horizontal gate bars to reduce the spacing size (to 400, 300 and 125 mm). Bats were logged automatically using infra-red beams, and night-vision video cameras recorded flight behaviour for 30 minutes at dusk and dawn.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)