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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Assessment of the short-term success of a translocation of lesser short-tailed bats (Mystacina tuberculata)

Published source details

Ruffell J. & Parsons S. (2009) Assessment of the short-term success of a translocation of lesser short-tailed bats (Mystacina tuberculata). Endangered Species Research, 8, 33-39


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Translocate bats Bat Conservation

A study in 2005 on Kapiti Island, New Zealand (Ruffell & Parsons 2009) found that nine of 20 translocated lesser short-tailed bats Mystacina tuberculata were recorded at the release site 232 days after release, and all were in poor condition. After eight months, captured bats were balding and had damaged infected ears and were subsequently returned to captivity. Four male and 16 female captive bred juveniles were released on the Island in April 2005 and provided with roosts and supplementary food (consistently for 55 days after release and irregularly for 156 days after release). Kapiti Island is a 1,965 ha nature reserve of forest and scrub located 40 km south west of the source bat population on mainland New Zealand. Bats were monitored using infrared video cameras, and caught in harp traps during three study periods after release in 2005 (eight weeks in April–June, five weeks in August–September, one week in November–December).

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)