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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Bat activity on riparian zones and upper slopes in Australian timber production forests and the effectiveness of riparian buffers

Published source details

Lloyd A., Law B. & Goldingay R. (2006) Bat activity on riparian zones and upper slopes in Australian timber production forests and the effectiveness of riparian buffers. Biological Conservation, 129, 207-220


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Retain riparian buffers in logged areas Bat Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2003 of 60 forest sites in New South Wales, Australia (Lloyd et al 2006) found that riparian buffers in logged forest had similar overall bat activity and number of bat species as riparian buffers in regrowth forest and mature forest, but one bat species was three times more active in riparian corridors than in mature forest. There was no significant difference in total bat activity or the number of bat species recorded in riparian buffers in logged forest (average 1.9 bat passes/hour, 0.3 species/hour), riparian buffers in regrowth forest (1.5 bat passes/hour, 0.3 species/hour) or mature forest (1.4 bat passes/hour and 0.4 species/hour). One bat species, the eastern forest bat Vespadelus pumilus, was three times more active in riparian buffers in logged forest than in mature forest (data not reported). Five replicates of four sizes of stream () were sampled for three treatments: riparian buffers (10–50 m minimum width) in logged areas (thinned and/or selectively logged in the last six years), riparian buffers in regrowth forest (logged 15–30 years ago), and mature forest (undisturbed for >50 years). At each of 60 sites, bat activity was recorded for two consecutive nights in January–April 2003.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)