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Individual study: Day roost selection in female Bechstein's bats (Myotis bechsteinii,): a field experiment to determine the influence of roost temperature

Published source details

Kerth G., Weissmann K. & König B. (2001) Day roost selection in female Bechstein's bats (Myotis bechsteinii,): a field experiment to determine the influence of roost temperature. Oecologia, 126, 1-9


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide bat boxes for roosting bats Bat Conservation

A replicated study in 1987–1996 in a deciduous forest in Bavaria, Germany (Kerth et al. 2001) found that female Bechstein’s bats Myotis bechsteinii roosted in 43 of 75 (57%) bat boxes, and black boxes in sunny locations were preferred by female bats during and after lactation. Female bats roosted more often during and after lactation in black bat boxes (186 bats during, 90 bats after) than white boxes (134 bats during, 22 bats after), and more in sun exposed boxes (276 bats during, 112 bats after) than shaded boxes (44 bats during, no bats after). Before giving birth, females roosted more in shaded locations (111 bats) than sunny locations (43 bats) but did not show a significant preference for black (76 bats) or white boxes (78 bats). Boxes of both colours were warmer in sunny locations (black: average 22°C; white: 20°C) than in the shade (black: 18°C; white: 17°C), and black bat boxes were warmer than white boxes. Seventy-five bat boxes (Schwegler design 2FN) were installed in 1987–1993. In 1996, 52 of the 75 boxes were rehung in pairs (one painted white, the other black) on 26 trees (half at shaded sites, half on trees exposed to the sun). Bat boxes were checked daily and box temperatures recorded in April–November 1996.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)