Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Roost selection by male Indiana myotis following forest fires in Central Appalachian Hardwoods Forests

Published source details

Johnson J.B., Ford W.M., Rodrigue J.L., Edwards J.W. & Johnson C.M. (2010) Roost selection by male Indiana myotis following forest fires in Central Appalachian Hardwoods Forests. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management, 1, 111-121


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use prescribed burning Bat Conservation

A replicated, controlled, site comparison study in 2007–2008 in two mixed forests in West Virginia, USA (Johnson et al. 2010) found male Indiana bats Myotis sodalis roosting in tree stands treated with prescribed fire and in unburned forest, and roost switching frequency and the distance between roost trees did not differ between burned and unburned forest. Sixteen roosts were in burned tree stands and 34 roosts were in unburned forest, but the difference was not tested for statistical significance. Roost switching frequency and the distance between roost trees did not differ significantly between burned (1–4 days, average 220 m) and unburned forest (1–2 days, 477 m). In April–May 2007–2009 three stands (12, 13 and 121 ha) within one of two of the forests (Fernow Experimental Forest, 1900 ha) were subjected to prescribed burning using a strip head fire technique. In the other forest (Petit Farm, 400 ha) in March 2003 an escaped campfire had burned part of the forest stand. Control stands were unburned areas in each of the two forests. Bats were captured over streams, pools, ponds and trails using mist nets in burned and unburned forest in June–July 2004–2006 at Petit Farm and June–July 2008–2009 at Fernow Experimental Forest, and also at a cave swarming site at Fernow Experimental Forest in September–October 2007–2008. A total of fifteen male bats were radio-tracked.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)