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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use by bats of patches of residual trees in logged areas of the boreal forest

Published source details

Hogberg L.K., Patriquin K.J. & Barclay R.M.R. (2002) Use by bats of patches of residual trees in logged areas of the boreal forest. American Midland Naturalist, 148, 282-288


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Retain residual tree patches in logged areas Bat Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2000 at nine sites in an experimental forest in Alberta Canada (Hogberg et al. 2002) found that the edges of residual tree patches had higher activity of smaller bat species than the centre of open clearcut blocks, but the activity of larger bat species did not differ. More bat passes of smaller bat species (calls detected at 45 kHz) were recorded along the edges of residual tree patches (average 4 bat passes/hour) and forest edges (5 bat passes/hour) than in the centre of open clearcut blocks (2 bat passes/hour). A similar number of passes of larger bat species (calls detected at 25 kHz) were recorded along residual tree patch edges, forest edges and in the centre of clearcut blocks (data not reported). Residual tree patches were oval (60 x 90 m). At each of nine clearcut blocks (8–10 ha, 1–2 years old), three locations were sampled (forest edge, residual patch edge, centre of clearcut block). Each of three locations within nine clearcut blocks was sampled for 15 minutes 2–3 times in a randomized order during one night in June–July 2000.

(Summarised by Anna Berthinussen)