Study

Diversity and abundance of bats (Chiroptera) found in bat boxes in east Lithuania

  • Published source details Baranauskas K. (2010) Diversity and abundance of bats (Chiroptera) found in bat boxes in east Lithuania. Acta Zoologica Lituanica, 20, 39-44

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Provide bat boxes for roosting bats

Action Link
Bat Conservation
  1. Provide bat boxes for roosting bats

    A replicated study in 2009 in 13 mixed or pine forests in East Lithuania (Baranauskas 2010) found that six bat species used bat boxes of four designs, but occupancy rates were not reported. Two bat species occupied the majority of bat boxes: Nathusius’ pipistrelles Pipistrellus nathusii (79% of all bats recorded and occupied boxes at all 13 sites) and soprano pipistrelles Pipistrellus pygmaeus (18% of all bats and occupied boxes at seven of 13 sites). The remaining bat species (pond bat Myotis dasycneme, brown long-eared bat Plecotus auritus, common noctule Nyctalus noctula and northern bat Eptesicus nilssonii) accounted for 2% of bats using bat boxes. Breeding colonies of Nathusius’ pipistrelles and soprano pipistrelles were found in standard and four and five chamber bat boxes. Flat bat boxes were not used by breeding colonies but were the only type of box in which all six bat species were found. In total, 504 bat boxes were installed (30–60 in each of 13 sites): 250 standard boxes (25 x 15 x 10 cm), 168 flat boxes (35 x 4 x 15 cm), 27 four chamber (30 x 15 x 15 cm) and 59 five chamber boxes (55 x 35 x 19.5 cm). Standard and flat wooden bat boxes were installed in 2004–2008, and four and five chamber bat boxes were installed in 2007–2008. All boxes were attached to trees facing southeast or southwest, 4–6 m above the ground and 20–200 m apart. Bat box checks and emergence surveys were carried out six times in May–October 2009.

    (Summarised by: Anna Berthinussen)

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