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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Tailoring of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Flesh Lipid Composition and Sensory Quality by Replacing Fish Oil with a Vegetable Oil Blend

Published source details

Torstensen B.E., Bell J.G., Rosenlund G., Henderson R.J., Graff I.E., Torcher D.R., Lie O. & Sargeant G.A. (2005) Tailoring of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Flesh Lipid Composition and Sensory Quality by Replacing Fish Oil with a Vegetable Oil Blend. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 53, 10166-10178


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Use an alternative oil source: plant-based Sustainable Aquaculture

Between 2002 and 2004, a replicated, controlled study comprising two trials in Scotland and Norway (Torstensen et al., 2005) found salmon, Salmo salar, fed fish oil and vegetable oil diets had different fatty acid compositions within flesh that reflected oil source. However, final body weights were similar (2.5kg on average). Growth rates were similar between diets. It was calculated a 200 g portion of salmon fed 75% vegetable oil would meet 80% of the recommended weekly human intake for very long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Groups of salmon juveniles were fed diets containing 100% fish oil, 75% vegetable oil or 100% vegetable oil, followed by a finishing diet period when all groups were fed 100% fish oil. The vegetable oil was composed of blended rapeseed, palm and linseed oil. The trials were conducted over 22 months in Norway and 25 months in Scotland.