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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Crop rotation and residue management effects on carbon sequestration, nitrogen cycling and productivity of irrigated rice systems

Published source details

Witt C., Cassman K.G., Olk D.C., Biker U., Liboon S.P., Samson M.I. & Ottow J.C.G. (2000) Crop rotation and residue management effects on carbon sequestration, nitrogen cycling and productivity of irrigated rice systems. Plant and Soil, 225, 263-278


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Amend the soil with fresh plant material or crop remains Soil Fertility

An experiment in 1994-1995 on silty clay in the Philippines (Witt et al. 2000) found 13-20% higher grain yields under early compared to late crop remains incorporation, without nitrogen or with low rates applied. There were two crop systems: continuous rice Oryza sativa, and a maize Zea mays-rice rotation. Maize was grown in the dry season, and rice in the dry. Within each 12 x 25 m cropping system were four 12 x 8 m nitrogen treatments: control (no nitrogen fertilizer), low (30 kg N/ha), medium (40 kg N/ha) and high application (50 kg N/ha). Within these were two 6 x 8 m sub-treatments: early (63 days before rice seedling transplanting) or late crop remains (rice or maize) incorporation (14 days before transplanting). Soils were sampled to 15 cm depth.

 

Amend the soil with formulated chemical compounds Soil Fertility

An experiment in 1994-1995 on silty clay in the Philippines (Witt et al. 2000) found higher grain yields under high (7.15 t/ha) compared to low (6.15) or no (2.95 t/ha) nitrogen fertilizer application. There were two crop systems: continuous rice Oryza sativa, and a maize Zea mays-rice rotation. Maize was grown in the dry season, and rice in the dry. Within each 12 x 25 m cropping system were four 12 x 8 m nitrogen treatments: control (no nitrogen fertilizer), low (30 kg N/ha), medium (40 kg N/ha) and high application (50 kg N/ha). Within these were two 6 x 8 m sub-treatments: early (63 days before rice seedling transplanting) or late crop residue (rice or maize) incorporation (14 days before transplanting). Soils were sampled to 15 cm depth.

Use crop rotation Soil Fertility

An experiment in 1994-1995 on silty clay in the Philippines (Witt et al. 2000) found 33-41% higher available carbon and nitrogen under the rotation compared to continuous rice Oryza sativa, resulting in 11-12% less carbon and 5-12% less nitrogen stored in the soil compared to under continuous rice. There were two crop systems: continuous rice Oryza sativa, and a maize Zea mays-rice rotation. Maize was grown in the dry season, and rice in the dry. Within each 12 x 25 m cropping system were four 12 x 8 m nitrogen treatments: control (no nitrogen fertilizer), low (30 kg N/ha), medium (40 kg N/ha) and high application (50 kg N/ha). Within these were two 6 x 8 m sub-treatments: early (63 days before rice seedling transplanting) or late crop residue (rice or maize) incorporation (14 days before transplanting). Soils were sampled to 15 cm depth.