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Individual study: Repeated applications of farmyard manure enhance resistance and resilience of soil biological functions against soil disinfection

Published source details

Wada S. & Toyota K. (2006) Repeated applications of farmyard manure enhance resistance and resilience of soil biological functions against soil disinfection. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 43, 349-356


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Amend the soil using a mix of organic and inorganic amendments Soil Fertility

An experiment in 2004 on light clay in Japan (Wada & Toyota, 2007) found that decomposition activity was higher under mixed amendment (18-49% of the control treatment activity) than under chemical amendment (1-37% of the control treatment activity). Decomposition activity under mixed amendment application recovered to control levels 2 (3 μg/g soil/h) and 10 weeks (0.9 μg/g soil/h) after disinfection (after metam sodium and chloropicrin application respectively), but under chemical amendment did not. Fungal contribution to decomposition recovered to control levels under mixed amendment application (1:1 with bacteria) compared with chemical amendment when disinfected with metam sodium. There were two 5 x 20 m treatments on soil which had previously grown melon Cucumis melo and cabbage Brassica oleracea: soil amended with chemical fertilizer, and amended with a mix of chemical and organic fertilizer (40 t/ha/y farmyard manure). Melon and cabbage had previously been grown. Soil samples were taken to 10 cm depth. Soils were disinfected with metam sodium or chloropicrin (to remove soil microorganisms) and incubated at 28˚C for 12 weeks.