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Individual study: Short-term effects of nutrient management regimes on biochemical and microbial properties in soils under rainfed ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.)

Published source details

Dinesh R., Srinivasan V., Hamza S., Manjusha a. & Kumar P.S. (2012) Short-term effects of nutrient management regimes on biochemical and microbial properties in soils under rainfed ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.). Geoderma, 173-174, 192-198


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Amend the soil using a mix of organic and inorganic amendments Soil Fertility

A controlled, randomized, replicated experiment in 2010 on clay loam in Kerala, India (Dinesh et al. 2012) found that soil organic carbon was higher under mixed amendments (16.3 g/kg) and organic amendments (17.4 g/kg) compared to chemical amendments (12 g/kg) or an untreated control (11 g/kg). Microbial biomass (indicated by carbon levels) was 28% and 52% higher under mixed and organic amendments respectively compared to chemical inputs. Ginger Zingiber officinale was grown in 3 × 1 × 0.15 m raised beds cleared of weeds. Treatments included organic amendments (farmyard manure, pressed neem Azadirachta indica waste, ash, vermicompost), chemical amendments (NPK – nitrogen/phosphorus/potassium at 75-50-50 kg/ha, urea, rock phosphate and potash), mixed (integrated) amendments (farmyard manure and NPK combined) and no fertilizer (control). There were five replicates. Four soil samples/bed were taken immediately after ginger harvest.