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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The use of urban organic wastes in the control of erosion in a semiarid Mediterranean soil

Published source details

Ros M., Garcia C. & Hernandez T. (2001) The use of urban organic wastes in the control of erosion in a semiarid Mediterranean soil. Soil Use and Management, 17, 292-293


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Amend the soil with municipal wastes or their composts Soil Fertility

A controlled, replicated experiment in 2000 on a semi-arid, coarse loamy soil in Alcantarilla, Spain (Ros et al. 2001) found that adding composted municipal waste was the most effective of three soil amendments, reducing soil loss by 94% and water runoff by 54% compared to an untreated control. Unstabilized municipal waste and sewage sludge reduced soil loss by 78% and 80% (respectively) and increased the soil’s ability to hold water by 43% and 24%. There were four treatments: an untreated control, municipal waste compost, an unstabilized municipal waste and sewage sludge. Treatments were tested in plots of 10 x 3 m and replicated three times. Stability of aggregated soil particles was measured and a runoff collector was installed downslope of each plot.

 

Soil: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study (year not reported) on a slope in Murcia, Spain, found less soil erosion in plots with added compost, compared to plots without added compost. Soil erosion and aggregation: Less soil was lost in runoff from plots with added compost, compared to plots without added compost, after rainfall events (eight initial events: 17 vs 299 g soil/m2; later events: 5 vs 62). Methods: Composted municipal waste was added to three treatment plots, but not three control plots (10 x 3 m plots, 15% slope). Soil loss was measured in runoff water, collected from the lower edge of each plot, after each rainfall event. Enough compost was added to the soil to increase its organic carbon content by 2%. The soil was rotovated to a depth of 20 cm, to incorporate the compost.

 

Water: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study (year not reported) on a slope in Murcia, Spain, found less water loss in plots with added compost, compared to plots without added compost. Water availability: Less water was lost as runoff from plots with added compost, compared to plots without added compost, after rainfall events (eight initial events: 2.3 vs 6.0 litres water/m2; later events: 6.2 vs 12.6). Methods: Composted municipal waste was added to three treatment plots, but not three control plots (10 x 3 m plots, 15% slope). Runoff water was collected from the lower edge of each plot, after each rainfall event. Enough compost was added to the soil to increase its organic carbon content by 2%. The soil was rotovated to a depth of 20 cm, to incorporate the compost.

 

Water: Add sewage sludge to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study (years not reported) on a slope in Murcia, Spain, found that less water was lost from plots with added sewage sludge, compared to plots without it. Water availability: Less water was lost as runoff from plots with added sewage sludge, compared to plots without it, after rainfall events (eight initial events: 2.1 vs 6.0 litres water/m2; later events: 5.7 vs 12.6). Methods: Sewage sludge was added to three treatment plots, but not three control plots (10 x 3 m plots, 15% slope). Runoff water was collected from the lower edge of each plot, after each rainfall event. Enough sewage sludge was added to the soil to increase its organic carbon content by 2%. The soil was rotovated (20 cm depth), to incorporate the sewage sludge.

 

Soil: Add sewage sludge to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study (year not reported) on a slope in Murcia, Spain, found less soil erosion in plots with added sewage sludge, compared to plots without it. Soil erosion and aggregation: Less soil was lost in runoff water from plots with added sewage sludge, compared to plots without it, after rainfall events (eight initial events: 48 vs 299 g soil/m2; later events: 25 vs 62). Methods: Sewage sludge was added to three treatment plots, but not three control plots (10 x 3 m plots, 15% slope). Soil loss was measured in runoff water, collected from the lower edge of each plot, after each rainfall event. Enough sewage sludge was added to the soil to increase its organic carbon content by 2%. The soil was rotovated to a (20 cm depth), to incorporate the sewage sludge.