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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Evaluation of the effects of resistance to stem nematode (Ditylenchus dipsaci) in white clover (Trifolium repens L.) under sheep grazing and cutting

Published source details

Williams T.A., Abberton M.T., Olyott P., Mizen K.A. & Cook R. (2007) Evaluation of the effects of resistance to stem nematode (Ditylenchus dipsaci) in white clover (Trifolium repens L.) under sheep grazing and cutting. Plant Breeding, 126, 343-346


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use grazing instead of cutting for pasture or grassland management Natural Pest Control

A randomised, replicated experiment in 2001-2004 in a mixed perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne and white clover Trifolium repens pasture in Aberystwyth, UK (Williams et al. 2007) found higher perennial ryegrass yields under grazing (770-2,312 kg/ha in 2002-2003) compared to cutting (171-1,083 kg/ha) regimes on most dates in two experiments. White clover yields were lower under grazing (111-1,352 kg/ha) than cutting (247-1,430 kg/ha) regimes on most sampling dates, but total yields (ryegrass and clover) were higher with grazing. Grazing did not improve the performance of a nematode-resistant white clover variety compared to a conventional variety (yields of 94-1,412 vs. 98-1,266 kg/ha respectively when grazed; 512-1,442 vs. 264-1,334 kg/ha when cut). Two experiments tested the effects of sheep grazing (April-October) vs. cutting six times/year, as well as using two white clover varieties (both individually and mixed together). One experiment was conducted under natural conditions (results were not presented) while the other supplemented the pasture with plants artificially infested with pest stem nematodes Ditylenchus dipsaci. Twelve plots of 5 x 4 m were subdivided into grazing (3.5 x 4 m) and cutting (1.5 x 4 m) areas. Yield samples measuring dry vegetation matter were taken on all cutting dates for three years (2002-2004).