Study

Management of Acyrthosiphon kondoi Shinji, blue-green aphid, and Therioaphis trifolii (Monell) f. maculata, spotted alfalfa aphid, by grazing and cutting lucerne

  • Published source details Bishop A.L., Greenup L.R. & Holtkamp R.H. (1980) Management of Acyrthosiphon kondoi Shinji, blue-green aphid, and Therioaphis trifolii (Monell) f. maculata, spotted alfalfa aphid, by grazing and cutting lucerne. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture and Animal Husbandry, 20, 710-716

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use grazing instead of cutting for pasture or grassland management

Action Link
Natural Pest Control
  1. Use grazing instead of cutting for pasture or grassland management

    A before-and-after trial in 1979 in lucerne Medicago sativa in New South Wales, Australia (Bishop et al. 1980) found a smaller reduction in predatory adult brown lacewings Micromus sp. after grazing (57% decline, from 8.6 to 3.7 adults/2 m²) than after cutting (91-94% decline, 5.1-7.0 to 0.3-0.6 adults). Numbers remained higher in grazed than cut lucerne seven days after treatment. Brown lacewing larvae declined by 82% in grazed compared to 98% in cut lucerne. Grazing and cutting caused similar declines for transverse ladybirds Coccinella transversalis (68% vs. 78-83%, respectively). Blue-green aphids Acyrthosiphon kondoi Shinji declined less under grazing (70% decline, from 93 to 28 aphids/3.1 m²) than cutting (89-90% decline, 66-113 to 6.6-12.1 aphids) but numbers were similar after seven days. Mowing, windrowing (piling cut vegetation in rows on the field) and baling lucerne before collection had little effect on pest or natural enemy numbers compared to harvesting directly into a trailer. Treatments included grazing (84 cattle for 1 day on 0.45 ha), cutting with a forage harvester and collecting the crop immediately (0.3 ha), and mowing and windrowing before baling and collection (0.3 ha). Aphids and predators were sampled with a suction sampler at 10 random quadrat sites/treatment.

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read latest volume: Volume 17

Go to the CE Journal

Subscribe to our newsletter

Please add your details if you are interested in receiving updates from the Conservation Evidence team about new papers, synopses and opportunities.

Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust